A Fatal Blow over Disabled Parking

Last night we watched a repeat of the Channel 4 documentary “One Killer Punch“, which examined the phenomenon of a one punch kill.  It was very emotive and as the mother of two young adult males, I feel devastated for the four families torn apart in the first and last cases shown.  Difficult to watch and I am sure extremely hard to make, there have been calls for it to be shown in all secondary schools. Everyone will have a different and personal opinion whilst watching these young men and the families speak on film and this is in no way meant to belittle a heartbreaking subject.

Rather I want to highlight the other case which all hinged upon the right to use a disabled parking bay.  I know that this is another emotive subject that those of us on “spoonie” social media will see discussed time and time again.  How many times is someone judged from the way they look as to whether they are worthy of that bay?

imageIn this heartbreaking incident, a man died because another judged that he was not in need of this parking space in a supermarket car park.  The attacker saw a gentleman walking out to place some goods in his car and, because he wanted the spot for himself and his disabled wife and he deemed the other unworthy of parking there, he got out of his car and hit the gentleman.  He didn’t stop to notice the blue badge sitting on the dashboard, or the name on it that showed it belonged to the gent’s wife.  He didn’t wait to hear that the lady was still in the store and suffers with rheumatoid arthritis.  Instead with one punch he floored a stranger and then calmly got back into his vehicle when he “heard his head crack on the ground” and drove home.

Several hours later a distraught family had to make the decision to turn off life support and another family suffers as a member is sent to jail.  What a senseless waste of a life.

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I know that there are some people out there who use relatives blue badges/disabled permits illegally, but I would like to think that they are in the minority.  In the UK being issued with a blue badge is no easy task now, and I’m sure that it is equally difficult elsewhere. I would  like to say to everyone please don’t be too quick to judge someone who doesn’t look “disabled” using a disabled parking bay – we are all different and our needs can vary from minute to minute.  Believe me, I would rather be skipping the length of the high street than needing to use a stick and wheelchair to enable me to park closer to that shop!

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Enabling rather than Disabling – A great post from I Told You I was Sick….and inspiration from a great little boy

I have just read a great piece on Jaime’s blog “I Told You I was Sick” and as someone who was given a walking stick – albeit a pink, sparkly stick – for her 40th birthday and now has a variety of aids including 2 wheelchairs about the house, this rings so many bells. Earlier in the week I watched a BBC programme called The World According to Kids and one delightful 9 year old boy was meeting his a wheelchair for the first time.  This little lad has a very rare form of dwarfism and whilst fiercely independent, he is now getting pains in his legs when walking any distance.  This prevents him from joining in with his family, taking part in activities with his friends and he described feeling sad that he had to be different.  This lovely boy is truly inspiring and actually had me in tears.

It was during this that my lovely girl, who is starting to experience more subluxations and pains herself, said that she really wished that everyone could see mobility aids such as wheelchairs as “enabling rather than disabling”.  Wise old head on young shoulders – that is my 14 year old!  She has seen first hand what a difference wheels have made for me.  So, please have a look at this great blog post:

Anxious about considering a mobility aid to help you get around? The thought of your disease or condition getting to a point which requires mobility help can be heartbreaking. And, especially if you are younger, the embarrassment or ridicule you anticipate for having to use a mobility aid might be hard to swallow.

Remember:

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Find the rest of the article at this link:   8 Signs a Mobility Aid Could Improve Your Life

“How to be Disabled…According to Stock Photography” Hilarious article by Autostraddle author Carrie

 

I have just read this article in Autostraddle and it really made me laugh – the slightly dark, manic humour of a nurse and spoonie!  I want to share it with you…..but if you are a spoonie who is easily offended steer clear!!

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“I have to take this moment to apologize. It turns out, dear readers, that I’ve been leading you astray. I thought I had this whole “being disabled” thing figured out — y’know, focusing on intersectionality, various forms of ableism, or political engagement — but nope! My mistake! Apparently I’ve been doing it wrong since birth and need to completely overhaul my approach. And who do I have to thank for such an urgent epiphany? The wide, wise world of Shutterstock.”…….

Full article at this link, do read to the end:

How to be Disabled, According to Stock Photography by Carrie

 

A Chronic Comparison?

I’ve had this post roaming around my mind for a couple of weeks now, and finally put pen to paper…or rather put the finger splints on and attacked the keyboard.

Last week I took part in an on line research forum into chronic lower back pain.  Due to confidentiality clauses I can’t tell you any details, but a group of us were required to spend at least an hour each day answering a series of questions, or giving our thoughts and feelings about our conditions.  We were also encouraged to comment on each other’s posts and interact as on any forum.  The week before Duncan and I went to an EDS support group, where we were joined by about 20 others and asked to think about our coping strategies for different aspects of the illness.  The final trigger was a tv programme featuring my chronic condition, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome.ch7jwb_weaaooad

So I feel that I’ve spent a lot of time recently reflecting on my various conditions and revisiting my “journey” – don’t you just hate that expression, very X Factor or Strictly Come Dancing!  It was suggested for the forum that we plot a picture of our individual pain journeys, and I was surprised at just how long it took me to do this and how much was on it.  Of course, I needed to go back to childhood as when I looked back I cannot remember a time of being without pain, but as a child and teen I assumed that everyone else felt the same way.  file_000-9

I know that it isn’t particularly clear but this is my “map” detailing the EDS and the original back injury and subsequent chronic back pain.  Those of us drawing these maps all had very different backgrounds & experiences, and I was really inspired and moved by some of the other stories. I started to become aware that some people were being put off the idea of certain treatments (eg surgery) because of the negative experience of others.

The support group was a night out for us the previous week, and we even managed a meal before.  It is good meeting with others in similar positions and it is always great to welcome new people who attend, particularly as we are a very new group. We were able to come away with some advice for dealing with extremely anxious teens – there is a lot of literature out there now that recognises a direct link between anxiety  and EDS.  I must admit though, that I do feel a little conflicted sometimes in these group situations – the support on offer can be fantastic, but it can also be tricky taking on board a line of treatment/therapy that someone else swears by that either hasn’t or may not work for you.  When another person has gone on, for instance, a special diet and all their symptoms have gone into remission giving them a new lease of life…..I used to see this when I was working in palliative care and patients would wonder if  they hadn’t tried hard enough with a particular diet or vitamin regime, that it was their own fault that they hadn’t halted their illness when this had cured Mr X.

I wonder if it is just human nature to compare ourselves to others, in sickness and in health as the saying goes. But just how infuriating is it when some well meaning person tells you about the wonderful remedy that Auntie Ethel has just used with great success for her back pain/migraines/or even a serious illness cure?  Do you not want to scream out “Do you really think that I haven’t tried?” because I know that I do!  But of course I don’t…..

When these comparisons happen, be it ourselves or others making them,  I wonder if there can be a thin line between support and competition.  I do realise that this probably sounds awful as no one who is chronically ill wants to compete with anyone else over symptoms.  But with some of the multi system syndromes that we spoonies have, no two people will ever present in the same way and the list of ailments we have can be endless.  I have been reading facebook posts only this evening from frustrated people who find that their own families don’t believe their diagnosis because “cousin Freddy has that and he is much worse”.  I think that we all know that there are still medics out there who call into question the legitimacy of some syndromes and the severity of patient symptoms.

Just because a certain operation helped me doesn’t mean that it will help you;  just because you have found a particular drug fantastic doesn’t mean it will help me; just because my health regime allows me to walk for miles every day doesn’t mean that it will get you out of your wheelchair (it doesn’t BTW – I use my chair more and more!).  My back & leg pain and the treatment that I have had to undergo to find any relief is very different to the chronic EDS pain that I also suffer.  The only people who have really understood the former have been my group on the scs pain programme and those in neuromodualtion groups.  Yet whilst some people who have fantastic success with the stimulators have had a new lease of life,  I have actually deteriorated physically despite the stimulator being a success.

My deterioration is down to my EDS, escalation of POTS and an increase in my EDS pain.  Ironically the requirement to wean myself off the opiates in order to have the stimulator to reduce one type of pain, resulted in an increase in the other!  Many people who have had back problems would be amazed that even with the metal screws fusing my spine and the electrodes to control the pain, I can still hold a pretty good downwards facing dog yoga pose.  But of course my zebra friends know that this is actually down to being bendy and that sometimes being able to get into those strange positions is, for us, more dangerous than beneficial.

I am probably my own worst enemy when it comes to making comparisons and always feeling that I have little to complain about.  This happened when I watched the BBC DIY SOS which featured 18 year old Antonia who has Ehlers Danlos Syndrome and had been hospitalised for 3 years. 15831613-large The programme was great for highlighting EDS and this amazing young lady – I watched it twice and cried each time.  Of course I turned to my lovely teen girl and said “I feel guilty for making a fuss!” and whilst her brothers would probably have agreed with me, my lovely girl (now suffering her own dislocations, hand pain, anxiety, etc) told me off for thinking that way telling me “It is all relative”.  Out of the mouths of babes….

So what am I trying to say?  We are all individuals.  We will all experience a common cold differently (think man flu!!).  So for the many debilitating chronic syndromes out there, no two sufferers will experience the same symptoms, the same reactions to therapies or the same psychological impact as another.  I must allow myself to live with my condition in the best way that I can and for you to do the same – and somewhere along the way we can support each other and hope that the healthy world will do the same without expectation or judgement.

 

 

 

A Chronic Christmas – inconvenient illness for the holidays

Pain pals,

I’ve been a bit low on spoons recently – ok, almost negative some days over the last month or so.  Blog posts, social media & all things requiring thought or energy have been low down the list of to dos.  Over the years I have been able to soldier on through the pain and dislocations, but I can honestly say that my worsening POTS/dysautonomic symptoms have made me feel so ill and the current drugs have done nothing to help.  Tricky getting ready for Christmas then when also caring for a house full of teens/students “dying” with coughs & colds!img_20161228_093658718

Wouldn’t it be great if chronic illness gave us a break over the holidays?  When the slightest change in the weather didn’t send symptoms into flight & flare? Shame it doesn’t work like that, but instead can stop us in our tracks.  I have lost count of the number of times in recent weeks when I have had to cancel plans, let people down and cursed my inability to just get on with life.  POTS meant I missed my nephew’s birthday party – he wasn’t bothered as Uncle Duncan was much better at go karting and I had managed the tricky task of baking a Lego Star Wars cake.

The school Christmas fair and the Early Years nativity were also off the social calendar at the last minute.  My teen daughter was secretly delighted that I wasn’t well enough to drag her to her school Christmas concert!  I have cancelled coffee & lunch, rearranged and then the same again.  We are supposed to feel merry & jolly in December, or so we are told, but it isn’t always easy when your body is screaming at you.

But there have been memorable moments.  I have spent this year trying so hard to shift some of the massive amount of weight that I’ve gained (chronic pain, immobility and drugs…lyrica mainly!) and was just starting to get some of my old clothes on, when I find myself on a synthetic steroid that will cause my ankles to resemble an elephants.  Fantastic!  One of my “lovely” sons said that he hoped this would mean that I wouldn’t feel the need to starve myself over Christmas as I was going to get fatter anyway.  Think there may be a silver lining there somewhere…..Then there was the first occasion that I put on my newly acquired compression tights – an ebay “bargain” at £30, I kid you not as they retail at £90! – it was a 2 person job, with my lovely girl helping her poor old mum puff & sweat the tightest lycra you can imagine up her legs.  We were both exhausted and if ever there has been a time to feel light headed this was it.  Then I remembered why I had put them on.  I had a school reunion – an 80s decade reunion in fact – that I had helped arrange, and now I wouldn’t be able to go to the loo all day as I couldn’t get my tights up or down!!  30792624840_5e2ed23d47_o
Said day was a great success, friends showed up who I hadn’t seen since school and whilst being there with a wheelchair was hard to get my head around, I did it.  About 40 converged upon a local hostelry for further refreshment after the formal lunch. Less said about the following days the better….

 

 

The wheelchair has seen some action and helped with Christmas shopping, a meal out and dragging the dog for walks.  I must add here that none of this would have been possible without my spinal cord stimulator – whilst it does not get rid of my pain completely, I would be unable to cope without it.  I might have missed some events, but we did see a particularly entertaining nativity “Lights, Camel, Action” performed by the 5 – 8 year olds at our school – alternative name could have been “Strictly Come Nativity”. Of course the occasion when we forgot to stick it in the car, I managed a fantastic faint at the checkout of Waitrose supermarket.  I terrified a couple of young assistants who ran for water & debated calling an ambulance, but came round to hear Duncan going back to finish paying for the shopping and telling the shocked cashier “don’t worry, she does this all the time”! Well, a sense of humour is vital.  The wheelchair even saw a trip to parents’ evening at the A level student’s school, much to his embarrassment.  I did point out that it is me who has to sit in it – funny though that he finds it quite hard to get his head around me using it, and it was left at the door.  I’m sure that he wished some of his teachers’ comments had been left there too – mainly of the “needs to start working harder ” variety!!  He is such a jammy sod though that he received an unconditional offer just before Christmas – not a reason to stop working I hear myself state on a daily basis.

The final week of the school term arrived and Duncan was jetting off to Italy to meet with the design engineers at a fellow small audio company.  The original plan had been for us both to go – Audio Deva are an artisan specialist company designing fantastic turntables that Duncan hopes his new venture “Intimate Audio” will work with – but it15057249_634518260052328_1346051735637983232_n all happened rather quickly and reality was I wouldn’t be well enough.  So the student engineer found himself on a pre Christmas jolly to Genoa – just as well though as I’m not sure how useful I would have been when they stripped down a deck and rebuilt it. Daniel’s soldering skills beat mine.  This left me alone with the teens and I did enjoy the couple of days I had to myself.  I have to admit that I didn’t and couldn’t do much, but watched various cheesy Christmas movies and also managed to read some chick lit on the kindle – easier to hold when wrists are dislocating & painful!  We even hosted a small party for my book club friends.The following week Duncan went on his travels again with a trip to the in laws with the A level student, leaving me with my girl.  She worries about me but we did ok with no falls, and even managed some baking (cranberry & cinnamon donuts).img_20161124_193246307img_20161228_093523565_hdr

So it really has not been all bad.  I have missed writing and the support of my social media chronic pals, but I know that you all “get it”.  Christmas has been exhausting and I am looking forward to some R&R now, (earplugs needed with both sons at home).

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Breakfast Xmas morning – wonky cutting courtesy of Mr Saul

But the family have pulled together, some more than others (thanks mum & dad!), and we have come through the festivities relatively unscathed – they still can’t see when the toilets need cleaning though!

I hope that you have had a peaceful Christmas holiday,  Claire x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The beautiful Italian home of Audio Deva

 

Great initiative by Tesco to safeguard disabled parking

How many times have you tried to park in a disabled bay for yourself or a passenger, only to find that none are available and that several of the cars already parked aren’t displaying a blue badge (disabled badge)?  It is so infuriating, but why can’t people appreciate just how difficult those extra few metres can be for someone who has mobility issues, or that the narrower parking spaces make it so difficult to juggle walking aids or wheelchairs?

I have just read this article in the Telegraph about a great initiative to safeguard disabled parking at Tesco stores.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/10/09/tescos-hi-tech-plan-to-hunt-down-cheating-shoppers-who-use-disab/

#Ehlers Danlos radio drama “Tinsel Girl and the Big Reunion”

Whilst scrolling through the BBC iplayer earlier searching for a good drama to listen to, I came across this series with the introduction “An uplifting comedy drama about the lifes, loves and misadventures of wheelchair user Maz”.

I was pleasantly surprised when I heard that main character Maz has a genetic condition that affects her connective tissues called Ehlers Danlos syndrome.  It makes me hope that the syndrome is becoming more widely known and recognised in the mainstream.  Actress, fellow zebra and patron of Ehlers Danlos UK, Cherylee Houston plays main character Maz.

Follow this link for Episode 1 of “Tinsel Girl and the Big Reunion” by Lou Ramsden

http://bbc.in/2aC2wIX

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Poor mobility: Ehlers Danlos v chronic pain Norfolk part 2

In my last ramblings I told you how I found the wheelchair really did help to increase my freedom whilst on holiday.  I have since started to receive some useful tips about the type of chair to really help increase my independence as well as my freedom, and have filled out the forms for the NHS service.  Not sure how this will work out, but we have decided as a family that a wheelchair will become a permanent feature in the family.1069398__safe_solo_oc_simple+background_transparent+background_earth+pony_wheelchair_handicapped_artist-colon-sketchydesign78_oc-colon-melody+shine

Something that I hadn’t expected was that health problems other than the chronic back & leg pain would necessitate the need for the chair whilst we were away.  The weather was beautiful and we were really blessed, but – and I do know I shouldn’t moan – it was extremely hot and humid.  I can already hear some of you shouting “but the woman can’t cope with the cold, or air conditioning, so surely hot summer weather should be good”!  You would have thought so – but for many of us with chronic conditions our bodies become highly tuned barometers and actually can’t cope with any exoctopus-the-pirate-1412024-639x470treme changes.  So becoming too cold or too hot will have an effect upon the nervous system, which in turn controls all the other systems of the body.  This is why one person can seem to have such a Pandora’s Box of conditions –
and once that lid is opened they can come tumbling out together or appear slowly over time.  We are all different and I do now realise that many afflictions that I have had throughout my life are actually all part of the Ehlers Danlos.

For as long as I can remember I have felt rough when the weather is humid – headaches, migraines, nausea, swollen feet & ankles,wrists & hands,  dizzy spells – all in varying degrees, but over the last couple of years I have had an increasing number of faints, black spots in front of my eyes and dizzy spells. puppet-2-1623730-639x425 The sudden sweats are awful – I feel like I’ve been in the shower, but no they aren’t “hot flushes” as I can feel quite chilly.  So during our week away the wheelchair was great for those very light headed spells when I was struggling to see.  It is all very well the nice neurologist telling me that I must lie down when I get the feeling coming over me, but that isn’t so easy when walking the coast path or perusing the gift shops.  I have said in a previous post that I don’t have an actual diagnosis as yet, but I have become increasingly aware that the symptoms fit in with a POTS picture – that is postural orthostotic tachycardia syndrome – or similar and this is more common in the Ehlers Danlos population.

My GP is aware and as I did a good swoon in her surgery last month, she advised me to increase my salt intake. salt-spoon-1318134-638x350 On one particularly hot day, Duncan had gone into a vinyl store and my girl was pushing me when we stumbled,quite literally,upon a butcher’s shop with a basket full of pork scratchings for sale outside the door.  This is probably not to be recommended as the healthiest option, but a hand full of these certainly helped me to feel better.  This last week at home has been tricky as the symptoms have been rough again and the bright light during a day out triggered a migraine.  I find that my senses become heightened, particularly the sense of smell – not good when the family pet has a rank case of halitosis – and taste immediately prior to a turn – be it a faint or a migraine.  The day out that pre-empted the migraine was to a local National Trust property with mum, Dunc, my daughter & nephew.  I can’t believe that I am saying this, but I missed the wheelchair!  I felt rough, it was a lovely day and I couldn’t go for a walk with the family.  I forced myself to walk through the flower gardens, but every step was painful and I think that the impulses from my spinal cord stimulator combined with the bright light may have been making the head pains & dizziness worse.light-texture-1195217-640x480  Within a short time of getting back into the car, the nausea had started and I had visual disturbance, followed by severe head pains. Great, something else to sort out!!

This weekend has been just us “girls” as all the men are away.  We’re doing ok, but my girl, having already relocated both shoulder joints when I woke up, then found me passed out on the bedroom floor yesterday.  She is becoming quite the expert – good job as her own shoulders slip & slide, and she can’t stand up without seeing stars.  I feel a more detailed EDS post coming….

 

BTW: hope you like the new PainPals logo! painpals logo

First forays in a wheelchair – Norfolk part 1

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We have just returned from a week away on the Norfolk coast (East Anglia) – hubbie, the lovely girl, my parents & 5 year old nephew.  It was touch and go as to whether I would go and this wasn’t down to my health issues, but rather my adolescents!!  Anyway after several difficult days – sorry can’t share! – we left the engineer in charge.  Would we come home to a house?  What about the little car insured for him to drive?  Wild parties? House guests? A traumatised dog?  The list could be endless leaving 20 & 17 year old boys home alone.

But away I went and we were blessed with the hottest week of the year so far.  When there is a little boy in the house and you have a sea view this can only mean one thing – the beach!  Sadly this was a part of the holiday that Auntie Claire was unable to take part in.  For a start just physically getting over the pebbles and onto the sand was nigh on impossible, and then there is the issue of cold, wet sand playing havoc with the nerve pain in my foot.  Paddling is a no, no!  Fortunately good old grandma & grandad were fantastic and sat on the beach, built sandcastles and went paddling – with a little help from Uncle Duncan & our lovely girl.

 

It was important for me that I was able to do as much as possible – both for myself and the family – but without flogging myself!  Not an easy balancing act, particularly with such hot weather.  My Ehlers Danlos symptoms – all POTS symptoms, although not formerly diagnosed yet, cardiology appointment next month – were really bad in the heat and this didn’t help with the whole pacing myself.  This is a whole post for later in the week.  As some of you might remember, I had bitten the bullet and hired a lightweight wheelchair in order to be able to increase my mobility – an attendant rather than self propelled as we figured that my poor old shoulder joints would not cope with wheel turning and remain in socket!

The first thing to point out is that Duncan returned a whole lot fitter….he would like me to say with a six pack, but we were only away for a week.  This is not to say that I spent all my time in the chair, but it certainly opened up possibilities for us that wouldn’t have been possible if I was walking.  A strong plus for Dunc was that he pushed me to the restaurant on one of our evening out and was able to have a drink – the journey home along the cliff path after a couple of ciders incorporated a few wheelies!  I was able to stay out for longer than had I been on foot, we were able to go further afield and I was better able to manage my pain.  The benefits far outweighed any negative concerns that were nagging me and it was a godsend as the weather grew hotter and I fainted more!

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The beautiful sunset & sea view from our living room

Many older people started chatting about difficulties getting about, finding a suitable ramp on the coast path, why I needed a stick, had I injured myself and I am too young to be like this.  Younger people don’t really engage in chit chat in the same way, but I was aware of a few sidelong glances, not so much pity but I hope that I don’t end up like that followed by embarrassment. The night that we went out to a lively Greek restaurant, we did leave the chair behind.  Great food followed by entertainment provided by the Constanzia brothers – the sons of the owners, who in their hayday appeared on Barrymore and Pebblemill (yes, we are talking ’90s!).  Of course as the music sped up and the tambourines& bongo were bagged by the children, the band encouraged the audience to learn some Greek dancing with the assistance of the waitress.

Our beautiful girl was definitely not going to get up to dance,  the picture above is the closest my brother(who came up for a day) will ever get to dancing – that is, his son playing the tambourine! – so the Greek mama, an elderly silver haired lady turned, to me.  In days gone by I would have been the first to jump up and I really miss that me, but I made my excuses that I couldn’t and she misunderstood me.  She thought that I meant that I didn’t know what to do, so when I lifted my stick off the floor and shouted over the music that I ‘m unable to walk properly, the poor woman was mortified.  I didn’t feel upset or put out as she didn’t know – how could she?  Sitting at the table, I can put on a pretty good show of being fit and healthy, after all pain is invisible as is the metalwork and electrodes in my spine.  What a shame then that my disability caused a third party such embarrassment.

I did make the best of it, in fact we made the best of it.  The house was a godsend for the mornings when I was unable to go out or the afternoons when I just needed to collapse with exhaustion.  We gave my parents some time off from grandparenting and did a trip to the zoo.  Children are so accepting and I made various little friends that day, as I was on their level in the chair.  I think that they just saw it as a buggy!!  We also managed to visit some exhibitions with our arty daughter – one of them contemporary and I must admit that I didn’t “get” all of the exhibits!  But it was great for Duncan to be able to push me to a fairly inaccessible 14th century church and then for me to be able to stand up and hobble round inside to view the pieces.  Our girl came away from the gallery in Holt inspired, with lots of encouragement from the gallery owner and with a packet of oil paints under her arm.  The table at home has swapped charcoal and watercolours for oils….

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Our girl’s painting of her grandparents’ bull terrier

Back home the hot weather continued on Sunday.  The house was still standing, the freezer somewhat emptier and the kitchen somewhat dirtier.  Our old dog, Sam, was delighted to see his mum, dad ……File 24-07-2016, 23 59 19and sister!

The five of us went for a trip to our local park together – believe me that this does not happen often these days.  I pushed the wheelchair initially and actually my walking was really helped by this.  Maybe a zimmer or triangular frame is in order!!  It was actually the EDS symptoms that drove me into the chair and I know that the boys were embarrassed, not for me, but for themselves!  They were far too busy catching imaginary Pokemon – I mean what is more embarrassing – running around after make believe Japanese creatures or pushing your mother in a chair?? Kids…..even if they are adults….nearly!

The chair has gone back and we now need to make a decision – although I think that it has already been made really.  I have the forms for the NHS service, but I am under no illusion that this will provide the lightweight, transportable type model that we have had.  Amazon, here I come…..

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Family selfie – in case the brothers were missing us!!

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At the beach – including Auntie Claire & her chair!