Normal or Difficult Problem? All depends which specialist I see……..the joy of chronic illness!

I had a Personal Independence Payment medical review this week (more of that another time!). My GP had requested a home visit, mainly as my dysautonomia/fainting is so much worse, but I was merely given another appointment a little nearer to home.  As it seemed near impossible to tie up the DWP who would have received the letter, with the review service (formerly known as ATOS) we decided between us that Duncan would try to get me there, but the GP was adamant not without all the letters that she had been sent recently.  Half a tree later we left her surgery – and this was just the correspondence since the beginning of the year.

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PAIN PALS BLOG

The day after the assessment, I received a copy of the letter dictated by my new rheumatologist to my GP.  Lovely man, but the person who he describes in this letter doesn’t appear to be me.  In fact she is completely at odds to the lady described a month earlier by the orthopaedic consultant, after a dislocation that required a trip to A&E!  The history of my shoulder pain was wrong, and apparently I have “a reasonable range of movement” …”with some discomfort” – ahem, I am hypermobile with very stretched ligaments & tendons so everything moves in every direction and I was actually referred for PAIN management.  Apparently my “other joints are normal” and I “really know how to manage my hypermobility syndrome”.

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The ortho consultant said “she has been having pain in that shoulder for some time and was seen by my colleague 2 years ago…” and “on examining her shoulder it moves through a reduced range and her x rays show progressive glenohumeral joint arthritis, with a marked difference from 2 years ago”.  He goes on to say “Unfortunately Claire has a very difficult problem to solve. She has EDS….& has developed arthropathy within the glenohumeral joint”.  I was told 2 years ago that if I were 30 years older I would be whisked in for a shoulder replacement……this time the consultant could see a huge deterioration on x ray, but again explained that a shoulder replacement with my EDS is just not really an option as my ligaments & cartilages are so stretched.  A shoulder replacement would not stand up to recurrent dislocations!

So, the thing that the two specialists agree is that I have a really good knowledge of EDS and both do recommend conservative treatment with physiotherapy – again!  The physio with expertise in hypermobility syndromes who the rheumatologist recommends is out of area; my old physio who works with the ortho consultant is no longer able to see me on the NHS as he is a Consultant physio……..

This is the reality of a condition that affects multiple body systems with no one person leading the care!  So now the search for a physio, who understands that I can’t be “fixed” but need ongoing rehab,  is ON!!!

The Princess and the Pea – from little Princess Rubie at My Stripy Life Blog

I have to share this post with you from My Stripy Life blog – a fellow EDS zebra.  Except part of this post has been written by 7 year old Rubie and incorporates a review of her favourite story.  Enjoy……

The story tells of a prince who wants to marry a princess, but is having difficulty finding a suitable wife.  One stormy night a young woman drenched with rain seeks shelter in the prince’s castle. She claims to be a princess, so the prince’s mother decides to test their unexpected guest by placing a pea in the bed she is offered for the night.  She covers the bed in 20 mattresses and 20 feather-beds. In the morning she asks the princess how she slept.  ……..

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Picture from My Stripy Life

For decades I have related to the story of the Princess and the Pea.  As a child I was always tossing and turning in bed at night uncomfortable…………Now, I have my own princess who feels every bump in her bed and is finding parallels with this story and her own life.  When she had to complete a book review for homework this week on her favourite traditional tale she immediately chose this story……”

To read Rubie’s review please follow this link:  Rubie’s review of The Princess and the Pea

The Elastic Girl – article from Emily Jane O’Dell

I found this article on Aljazeera.com by Emily Jane O’Dell on living with Ehlers Danlos syndrome – so good to see fellow zebras thriving out there!

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Emily Jane O’Dell teaches at Sultan Qaboos University in the Sultanate of Oman.

Muscat, Oman – I am elastic girl. I’m as stretchy as they come, but I’m coming undone. My joints keep dislocating. Tendons tearing, ligaments loosening. Even my voice box is leaping out of place. What’s a girl with messed up glue to do?

“You should join the circus!” adults used to say when I showed them contortionist tricks as a child. Back then, I thought my freakish flexibility was a superpower. But my superhero dreams were dashed when I got hit by a bus while riding my bike in Harlem, learning while in recovery that I have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome – a rare and incurable connective tissue disorder that can cause dislocating joints, rupturing organs, blindness, and even death from cardiac defects.

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I live now in awe of what the body can do, and amazed by how a soul can soldier on despite the body being so broken’ [Photo courtesy of Eddie Chu]

My limber limbs once primed me for master ballet classes with Gelsey Kirkland and All-State varsity sports titles. Reaching the highest levels of Ashtanga yoga was a breeze. But what was once a blessing has become more like a curse.

Disjointed

Dozens of times in a day, my bones would slip from their sockets – my elbows when I swim, my fingers when I type, my shoulders when I open a door. I almost choked to death on my own voice box last summer when I was swimming backstroke and my larynx ripped out of place. Left in its wake – a paralysed vocal cord.

Call me Humpty Dumpty for I am beyond repair. Though I am in need of a number of surgeries, surgeons do not dare to suture my widespread tears. The risk of cutting into my cursed cartilage and stitching up my slow-healing skin is too great. I bear many wounds that will never heal.

I landed in a hospital in Turkmenistan a few years ago after my hips tore out of place while I was researching Sufism and shamanism on the border with Iran. “Eta elastichniya deyavooshka,” the Soviet-trained doctors said in Russian – “This is an elastic girl”.

For full article go to : The Elastic Girl: Living with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

Monday Magic – Inspiring Blogs for You

Monday MagicWe are all here in the UK, after a very difficult week, enjoying another bank holiday Monday.  I don’t want to write anything other than our thoughts and love are with everyone in Manchester.

This week the youngest household zebra has been away on a German exchange trip and has had the most fantastic time.  I must give so much credit and thanks to the staff and her host families – particularly for quietly acknowledging that her joint and pain problems might impact upon some of the visits.  I think that the visit to caves involved a serious number of steps!!  She has returned on a high, despite having her bag & mobile phone stolen, and the whole group of English and German teens are still chatting constantly on a group chat (you can imagine – “how quickly can I get a new sim card, dad??”)…..watch out for the return visits in October.

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Today also marks the last Monday in May and so the last in Ehlers Danlos Awareness month.  I am shamelessly going to share posts and sites that are all from people affected in some way by EDS – from Vlogs on Youtube, to an author to beauty blogs.

For a little Monday Magic, make a cuppa, sit back and enjoy!  Please remember to like, share and comment to make someone’s day!

https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=lara%20bloom%20eds# – this appeared on Sky News 28/05/17

http://mystripylife.com/2017/05/zebraday-2017/#more-7973

https://ribbonrx.com/2017/05/26/the-unpredictability-of-pots/

http://www.hospitalprincess.com/2017/05/this-is-what-ehlers-danlos-syndrome-is.html

http://www.edsneeds.com/spoonie-press/2017/5/27/mylifeinzebrastripes

http://caitlinswish.com/

https://spooniecentralbeautyandfashion.wordpress.com/about/

http://www.potsuk.org/stories/54

https://www.facebook.com/sherry.selfe.pro?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE#

 

 

 

Friday Feelings with Pain Pals Blog

I am really pleased to have been featured on The Zebra Mom regular Friday Feelings feature. Please check it out – and the rest of her great blog! Claire x

The Zebra Mom

Hey there, hi there, ho there!

As it is Ehlers Danlos Syndrome Awareness Month, during the course of May, we will be reading the diary entries of EDS sufferers. Each person experiences their illness differently and I think it will be interesting to see these differences throughout the month.

This week I spoke to Claire from Pain Pals Blog. The mum of two previously worked in health care but medically retired nine years ago. She now works in the education system and enjoys Spoonie friendly hobbies.

Claire was diagnosed with hypermobile EDS at 42. She also suffers from migraines; dysautonomia/POTS, chronic nerve pain, gut problems, Raynauds, neurogenic
bladder and reactive depression. You can find Claire on Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram. 
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“Hi, I’m Claire. I am a married mum of 2 boys aged 21 and 18, and a girl aged 14 living on borders of South London & Surrey, UK. My career was…

View original post 1,195 more words

For EDS Awareness month from Sunshine & Spoons “What It’s Like To Be A Kid With Ehlers Danlos Syndrome” – including mine!

Another great post for Ehlers Danlos Awareness month, this time from Hannah at Sunshine and Spoons blog.  As a child growing up with aches and pains, dislocations, sprains, dizzy spells, clumsiness, migraines, circulation problems….it really was just how life was as no one even thought to join the dots, let alone consider a syndrome that might be responsible.  I never even heard the name “Ehlers Danlos” until my late 30s – although Marfans was mentioned to me aged 20.

I do know about EDS now and have made it my business to as so many with rare illnesses need to.  The result has been that I recognise my kids are growing up symptomatic – although getting a diagnosis is proving difficult as referrals are pushed from the desk of one consultant to another – and understanding that not everyone has pain daily, struggles to keep up with hand writing in class, is constantly twisting an ankle or popping a joint.  One son is living with severe migraines for which we seem to be in a constant loop of changing medication to bring some control as he is about to sit his A level exams.  His long neck gives him daily pain and undoubtedly contributes to his migraines.  My daughter, aged 14, has dislocations, daily joint pain, dizzy spells, writing problems…..the eldest, the student engineer aged 21, is hypermobile, has a sternal “deformity”, clumsiness, dizzy spells – sound familiar?? All three, whilst very bright, suffer massive anxiety to such an extent that over recent years we have visited CAMHS, Heads Together, use of anti depressants and mindfulness techniques.  I feel a whole post coming on…..being the age they are, mum has not been able to pin them down for a quote as I write this!!

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My younger 2 zebras and me!

So without further ado let me introduce some great children who have spoken to Hannah:

This post may be a little hard for you to read. I know I had tears in my eyes more than once while typing this up.

If you’ve been hanging around Sunshine and Spoons for very long, you know that at least 3 of my 4 kids have Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, which they inherited from me. Davy (3) and Nano (7) don’t really understand it yet, but Katie (9) does. She goes back and forth between being proud of being a zebra to asking why God would make her have EDS and all of the pain that goes along with it.

Kids are supposed to be able to run and play. They shouldn’t have to deal with chronic pain and fatigue. They shouldn’t have to spend their childhoods at doctors’ offices, wearing braces and explaining random bruises.

But, that’s not how things always work. I interviewed 25 kids who have EDS to see what it’s really like to be a child or young person with the disorder. “

What it's like to be a kids with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

 

For the remainder of the post and the children’s quotes please click on the following link

What It’s Like To be a Kid with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

Living with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome – film for #EDSAwarenessMonth

I am really pleased to have contributed, in a small and rather quiet way, to this video that Jenni has put together for EDS Awareness month.  Jenni is a vlogger/blogger and goes by the name 1nvisibl3Girl – please have a look at her channel & blog and the social media sites of the other great (very young!!) EDSers on this short film!!

“This video is all about living with Ehlers Danlos syndrome (EDS) as the zebras I have been lucky enough to get to know, and I, share our own experience of this chronic, invisible illness. We talk about what EDS is to us, how we manage our symptoms, how EDS has changed our lives, why we started our own EDS based blog or vlog and our hopes and dreams for the future. We hope this is shared as much as possible this May as it is #EDSawarenessmonth so people can learn what it is really like to live with EDS but also to support those also living with the disease. I know it is long but please watch it all if you can. There are some amazing people describing some very difficult things in their own words. This is a project I am very proud of.” Jenni Pettican

Managing dislocations – “I’m just Popping out for a While” – article by Jason Parry, Specialist physiotherapist

This article appears on the Ehlers Danlos Support UK Facebook page during EDS Awareness month.  It offers great tips for managing the dislocations that are a part of every day life for us zebras.

‘I’M JUST POPPING OUT FOR A WHILE!’

Article by Jason Parry, Highly Specialist Physiotherapist

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One of the most common questions I get asked is how to manage dislocations and subluxations, which is quite strange if I happen to be popping to the shops for some milk at the time. However, in all seriousness, this really is one of the most frequent questions I face in clinic when treating many of my hypermobile patients and let’s face it, it really is no laughing matter.

So where do I begin? Well, a good place is to firstly understand the difference between a dislocation and a subluxation.

A dislocation is defined as “displacement of a bone from its natural position in the joint”. This is where the two bones that form a joint fully separate from each other. If we consider a shoulder, for example, which is a ball and socket joint, a dislocation occurs when the ball (which forms the top of the arm bone) slips entirely out of the socket it should sit in within the shoulder. This can happen in any direction, but the main point is that the two bones completely separate. Ouch!

A subluxation is basically defined as “a partial dislocation”. It can be no less painful than a full dislocation, but the two bones that form the joint are still partially in contact with each other. So once again, if we consider the shoulder joint as an example, the ball which completely came out of the socket in the dislocation example above would still be partially sitting in the socket in a subluxation.

These events can happen in almost any joint, but some are more commonly involved than others, with shoulders, knees, thumbs and ankles seemingly some of the most prevalent.

Both dislocations and subluxations can be painful, irritating, infuriating and occasionally debilitating problems. However, they don’t need to ruin your life and can, with patience, effort, trust and time, be managed. Not necessarily completely eliminated, but managed.

Let’s first look at the reasons why dislocation or subluxation happens with a quick anatomy lesson. The main reason is abnormal collagen composition. Collagen – primarily Type 1 collagen – is the main structural protein of the various connective tissues in the body. It is found in ligaments, tendons and joint capsules, and makes ligaments and tendons strong like little ‘guy ropes’. What do ligaments and tendons and joint capsules do? Ligaments connect bone to bone, tendons connect muscles to bone, and joint capsules are like envelopes of tissue that surround a moveable (synovial) joint. So we can see that these ligaments, tendons and joint capsules play an important role in giving a moveable joint its stability.

Let us now consider hEDS (hypermobile type EDS). This is a Heritable Disorder of Connective Tissue (HDCT) caused by a defect in the structure, production or processing of collagen, which makes the collagen in ligaments and tendons stretchier (more lax). This means that joints are potentially less stable – hence greater propensity for subluxations and dislocations.

There are other reasons for dislocations and subluxations:

• Altered muscle tone: This can often account for dislocations. Inappropriate muscle patterning, in which certain muscles around a joint ‘switch on’ when they shouldn’t and then inappropriately work way too hard, can often ‘pull’ a joint out of place. The joint then also becomes easier to slip out, of course, if it is more lax in the first place. Muscle fatigue, spasms and stress can all play a part in this too.

• Impaired proprioception: Proprioception is the body’s ability to sense position and movement within joints and enables us to know where our limbs are ‘in space’ without us looking. It relates to coordination. Impaired joint position sense can cause joints to slip out of place.

• Repeated overstretching: Otherwise known as too many ‘party tricks’. I know many of you guys have the capacity to ‘amaze’ people with your ability to wrap yourselves into weird and wonderful positions that the rest of us gawp at. You know, those tricks you did as kids, popping your shoulders in and out of joint, or folding your legs over your head? Well, stop – it’s no good for you! Repeated overstretching to that degree will only exacerbate the laxity and the chances of the joints slipping out of place. I’m certainly not saying that you should never do stretches, but I am saying give up the party tricks and don’t stretch your joints way beyond ‘normal’ range. Just because the joint ‘goes there’ doesn’t mean you should take it there. So please forget about that career as a contortionist with Cirque du Soleil.

• The shape of your joint surfaces: Some of you may be born with shallow-shaped joint sockets or other bony shaped ‘anomalies’ that predispose a joint to possibly slipping out of position more easily. Unfortunately, that just may happen to be the shape of your skeleton.

• Traumatic incident: One of the most common reasons for a joint to come out of place for those of us without EDS. Traumatic incidents can happen to anyone, but your extra joint laxity may actually work a little in your favour with this one; it may prevent you damaging some of your ligaments/tissues in the way that a non-hypermobile person who suffered a traumatic dislocation probably would.

How often can these subluxations/dislocations happen, I hear you ask? The answer to that is different for different people. Some people get them maybe just once or twice a year, others once a month. Some people get them once a week and others once a day. Some people get them repeatedly throughout the day and in some people they never seem to stop. Either way, we need to try to reduce the frequency if we can, and manage them when they do happen.

In some people, the joint just finds its own way back in to place, and phew, what a relief. But in others, once the joint slips out, it won’t go back in again. The pain kicks in (often big time) and the most common and perfectly understandable reaction is… PANIC! At this point, some people pick up the phone and call for an ambulance – well actually they don’t; they’re often writhing in agony or they can’t actually pick up the phone especially if its their shoulder or wrist out of place, but someone else does – and off to A&E they go.

BUT WHOA THERE! STOP FOR A SECOND, DON’T PANIC, BREATHE NORMALLY AND STAY CALM!!

Panic causes more stress and more muscle spasms. Stress and muscle spasms cause more pain, and then there is less chance of resolving the dislocation. Easy for me to say, I know, sitting here with my joints all lovely and located without the associated agony. But trust me, if you want to start managing this situation and taking control, then this is what you’re going to have to begin to practise. Because what happens at A&E? Well, if they aren’t already fed up with you turning up 100 times a month and starting to get all ratty towards you – not fair I know – they will often give you pain relief of some sort (perhaps Entonox) or they may go the whole hog and give you a general anaesthetic. Then they’ll yank your joint back into place. All good, right? Not so, because often, maybe within minutes, the joint will pull itself back out of place again because of the muscles still spasming around the joint, and you’re back to where you started.

So what else do our A&E docs then sometimes do? They stick you in a plaster cast to ‘hold’ the joint in place. Imagine, then, the battle going on underneath it – your joint trying to pull itself back out of position again while being forcibly held in place by the cast. Sounds painful to me, and often is – and when then do you take the cast off? This doesn’t sound like a viable management solution to me or a good way of life for you.

So what should you do if your joint comes out? Here are the 6 key principles that I suggest you need to start incorporating in order to begin to get a grip of managing this situation as opposed to this situation managing you. The main aims are to stay calm, keep on top of the pain and allow the muscles to relax. It takes lots of practise and patience, but it can be done.

1. Breathe : Use slow deep, relaxed breaths. Try using some relaxation techniques, there are lots of different ones out there. As painful as it is, and as difficult as it may sound, you need to start to try to take control of this situation. So start to learn how to breathe through it.

2. Use Painkillers: Oh yes! I’m not a monster you know; I know how painful this situation can be. I’m not for a minute suggesting that you should just sit there and ‘suck it up!’ For goodness sake, take some appropriate painkillers (analgesia) if you have some. However, note the word ‘appropriate’. You should only ever take analgesia according to the dosage indicated by your prescriber. Never take more than the suggested dose. You might feel like it may not be enough at the time, but if it can take some of the edge off, then that’s a great start. Please don’t ever overdose.

What about Entonox (commonly known as gas and air) as pain relief? I am aware that some people have access to Entonox at home, or use it at A&E. There can be a role for it, but this must be used with caution. Prolonged use can lead to vitamin B12 deficiency and can interfere with DNA synthesis, not to mention cultivating a dependency, which are all big issues.

3. Support the joint: You need to try to make yourself as comfortable as possible (I know it’s not easy). Use pillows or a sling of you have one. Find a comfortable resting position as much as possible. This allows the muscles to relax and stop spasming.

4. Try heat: Hot water bottles, wheat bags and a warm bath can all help to relax spasming, overactive muscles.

5. Distraction: Try to take your focus away from the pain and the situation. Listen to music, watch a film if you can, talk to friends/family, try a relaxation CD/MP3. This can be helpful as a short-term pain relieving strategy. Again, it can help muscles relax.

6. Gentle massage: Sometimes gentle massage around the joint can help relax the muscles enough to be able to gently re-locate the joint or for the joint to just slip back into place by itself.

What if it doesn’t go back, I hear you scream (and I do hear you scream)?!

Don’t expect the joint to go straight back in. It is often not unusual for joints to remain out of place for hours or even days. But once it’s out, it’s out. It’s not going out even more, so try not to panic.

Isn’t it dangerous though? What about damage? Am I damaging my joint if it comes out?

It is highly unlikely. Your joint laxity allows for your ligaments and capsules to stretch. It is mostly just distressing as opposed to damaging.

When should you go to hospital or get help?

• if the limb starts to change colour due to a lack of blood supply
• if your limb goes completely numb
• if you have tried strategies 1-6 above, have waited a reasonable amount of time, and are still desperately struggling.

But as mentioned earlier, it is not unusual for A&E to relocate your joint only for it to pop straight out again or when the anaesthetic wears off. Therefore you need to learn to stay calm and to start to self-manage.

Learn Lessons!

One of the most valuable things you can do after a subluxation/dislocation is to reflect on the event once you have had a chance to calm down. Were you moving in a way that normally causes the joint to dislocate? Did you move without thinking? What was your posture like? Were you tired or overdoing it? Were you stressed about something? It is so valuable to look for triggers as to why the event may have happened. It may have been none of these reasons, but if it was, then you can hopefully learn to avoid repeating them in the future.

Finally, prevention is better than cure! It is obviously better if we can prevent these situations occurring in the first place as opposed to having to deal with them. To that end, the following can hopefully help to reduce the frequency of such occurrences:

• physiotherapy to learn to control the muscles around joints and to use the right ones
• rehab to improve proprioception
• the possible use of supports/braces if required
• trying to manage stress and anxieties.

But ultimately, stay calm! The more you stay calm when these events happen and manage it yourself, the easier it should get each time.”

#EDSawarenessmonth

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